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Gravedigger
 Post subject: The Agoraphobia theory
     
         
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Missing since: 05 Aug 2010
Notes left: 565
Last seen at: Nathan Ave.
INTRODUCTION
This paper was written in regards to the theory of agoraphobia, a mental disorder that causes the fear from wide-open spaces. There are multiple in-game facts and plot information that are competent enough to describe in details the mental disorder Walter Sullivan suffered from. These same in-game facts can be linked to real psychology definitions, making them more actual and realistic. However, I must admit the presence of some potential problems, which can be defined as restrictive. Agoraphobia is an extremely complex disorder connected to other disorders. And relatively speaking, each disorder that proves agoraphobia can be interpreted as an individual disorder, making the subject more of a chain-linked fortress. Furthermore, the world of Silent Hill 4 and of Silent Hill in general is rather moved by philosophical standards, so it’s harder to connect real life psychology basics to philosophically like cosmos. Notification: there are some spoilers present in this topic regarding Silent Hill 4 and others. Well, these were my few formal introductory points. Here goes the real stuff.

PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTS
1) Agoraphobia (from Greek "marketplace") is an anxiety disorder defined as a morbid fear of having a panic attack or panic-like symptoms in a situation that is perceived to be difficult (or embarrassing) from which to escape. These situations can include, but are not limited to, wide-open spaces, crowds, or uncontrolled social conditions. Alternatively, social anxiety problems may also be an underlying cause. As a result, sufferers of agoraphobia avoid public and/or unfamiliar places, especially large, open spaces from which they cannot easily escape if they have a panic attack. In severe cases, the sufferer may become confined to his or her home, unable to leave their safe haven.
Agoraphobia develops typically as a result of having a panic disorder. In a small minority of cases, however, agoraphobia can develop by itself without being triggered by the onset of panic attacks. This is the case of Agoraphobia without History of Panic Disorder.

Judging from the general definitions, this paper is related not only to the fear of wide open spaces as agoraphobia, except being a phobia, may also manifest itself as an anxiety disorder. When I’m going to mention fear of open spaces, it can be interpreted as a result of anxiety, too. However, I shall refrain myself from proving anxiety in detail as proves for it are in minority. Nevertheless, if someone wishes, it may considerate facts within the second type of agoraphobia or within a more relative point of view that comprehends the “typical” type triggered by an anxiety disorder. In both cases, the theory is 100% compatible. It’s a matter of choice whether to embrace a more specific version or the big picture.

2) Agoraphobia is usually a result of dissociation.
Here is a sketch of the dissociative function linked with agoraphobia.

.......a.................b.................c.
Agoraphobia + trauma --> Dissociation --> I. DID
........................................................ --> II. Derealization
........................................................ --> III. Depersonalization

______________.........____________________.................________________
...................................b. the cult's brainwashing..............c. formation of
..a.Walter's fear......+.......(abuse by Andrew............---->.......an altered state
....of open space..............Desalvo and placement.................of consciousness
______________..............in Water Prison)...........................(Otherworld)........
................................................................................................I
................................................................................................I
_______________________________________________________I
..............I..................................I.......................................I
.._______________.........______________..............________________
...I. the presence............II. incomprehension
........of two halfs................of today's world.............III. incomprehension
.....the formation..............spoiled by.....................of Walter's
........of child Walter............mankind.......................sense of self
.._______________........______________..............________________

It is fundamental to link the in-game world with real psychology if we want to perceive the presence of a real disorder (such as agoraphobia).
These are the links (explanation of the sketch):

a. Onset is usually between ages 20 and 40 years. Agoraphobia, as studies have shown, has two age groups at which the first onset generally occurs — early to mid-twenties and in the early thirties.
Walter was approximately 25 years old when the killing spree began.

b. In response to a traumatic event, anxiety may interrupt the formation of memories and disrupt the learning processes, resulting in dissociation.
It is implied that Walter’s stay in the cult has been extremely abusive, in a mental and physical way. It is known that Andrew De Salvo had a short temper and that the long abode of disobedient children in the Water Prison had been mentally terrifying.

c. Dissociation is an altered state of consciousness characterized by partial or complete disruption of the normal integration of a person’s normal conscious or psychological functioning.
In the universe of Silent Hill, the Otherworld, among other definitions, is defined as an altered state of consciousness.

Common dissociative disorders are derealization (DR), dissociative identity disorder (DID) and depersonalization.

I. DID is a psychiatric diagnosis that describes a condition in which a person displays multiple distinct identities or personalities.
The idea of doubles, within Team Silent, has been carried since the production of Silent Hill 2, which also influenced the script of Silent Hill 4. In Silent Hill 4 we have two different aspects of fractured identities. The first one embraces the two halves of Walter. It has been speculated that these have been present since the beginning (possibly when Jimmy Stone sneaked Valtiel into Walter’s mind), by which means one dies for the guilt it felt towards the Locane children. However, the other one still lives and digs out the ‘dead’ half to perform the Holy Assumption. That way it can split again into the child and adult part, the second aspect of the fractured identities.

II. Derealization- a feeling of disconnection from one's surroundings. It is an alteration in the perception or experience of the external world.
As we observe the definition, the topic here is in fact the anger towards the dark and impure world. The 21 Sacraments can be interpreted as Walter’s revenge towards the world (among the general facts).

III. Depersonalization- a feeling of disconnection from one's self. It is a feeling of watching oneself act, while having no control over a situation. Sufferers feel they have changed, and the world has become less real, vague, dreamlike, or lacking in significance. It can be a disturbing experience, since many feel that, indeed, they are living in a "dream".
An article achievable in Silent Hill 2 describes the murder of the Locane victims, Miriam and Billy, slaughtered by Walter Sullivan. He responded in his defense: “It was me, but I didn’t do it.” The fact links itself to the idea of doubles. Walter felt disconnected from his body, possibly for the presence of Valtiel in his mind (that predominated in the decision of the 10 Hearts victims- depersonalization is a feeling of watching oneself act, while having no control over a situation). Therefore, not being capable of controlling his body, Walter came to the conclusion of destroying it. Automatically, the ‘other one’ receives the assignment to get it back and restore itself through the Holy Assumption. Afterwards, it could gain connection to himself again.

3) Triggers for agoraphobia may include wide open spaces, crowds (social anxiety), or traveling (even short distances). Agoraphobia is often, but not always, compounded by a fear of social embarrassment.
Besides open spaces, agoraphobia often enfolds other symptoms (crowds, travelling). If the world is perceived as a huge place so it is perceived as crowded, too. Walter, during his travelling, has met a lot of places: Silent Hill, South Ashfield, Pleasant River, etc… By discovering new places, he discovered different people. In fact, social embarrassment has been implicated in some moments. In the Translated Memories site, in the Another Crimson Tome section, it is mentioned that Walter, during his college years, has been refused by Cynthia Velasquez in front of her friends. Jasper Gein was the one who named him “devil”, also in front of his friends. Andrew Desalvo abused him in the Order in front of other kids. Richard Braintree yelled at him and kicked him out of the apartments. When Eileen was young she left him a doll when her mother pulled her by the hand. Eileen was the only that didn’t make him feel like the others did, so it may be a valid reason of why child Walter spared her from death. However, the problem with this fact is that the material provided by the He and His victims and the Another Crimson Tome section are unofficial. Therefore, it’s relative whether you’ll embrace it as reliable information. Furthermore, as it’s known that Walter travelled a lot from Silent Hill to Ashfield and considering his experience with individuals, it is likely that he developed a fear of big spaces, embarrassment and crowd, leading eventually to agoraphobia and possibly, but less likely, to anxiety (as there are no more concrete implications that may prove such fact).

4) In severe cases, the sufferer may become confined to his or her home, unable to leave their safe haven.
A very powerful element of the Silent Hill 4 script is the Room. Walter firmly believes that room 302 is his mother asleep and that he needs to wake her up through the ritual of the 21 Sacraments. Therefore, room 302 becomes his safe haven, the only real place in which he’ll find true peace. Furthermore, when Walter was younger, his extreme obsession with the room led him to travel, every day, from Silent Hill to Ashfield. Now, we can find a distinction here. Although Walter perceives room 302 as a sense of safety and security, the player does not. And nor does Henry, nor Joseph.

The Walter – Joseph/Henry/player opposition
On the one hand, Joseph, Henry and the player feel opposite sensations of Walter due to his invasion: as Room 302 became Walter’s save point, to Joseph it became a prison. Because of being locked in the room for days, he started feeling a sense of confinement and needed to escape (it resulted with confusion, distorted perception of time- he practically became insane). Walter’s need to narrow the world (which will be proven further) spreads a sense of confinement. On the other hand, the Room is Walter’s escape from reality, or for him: to reality. Joseph though prefers to expose the truth to the big world Walter fears so much. Therefore, Joseph became part of the sinful world. Finally, we’ve got two opposites: the agoraphobic Walter and a metaphorically claustrophobic Joseph.

THE BOXLIKE WORLD
A Book Scrap can be found at the beginning of the game: “Through the Ritual of the Holy Assumption, he built a world. It exists in a space separate from the world of our Lord. (…) a world only he can control.”[/i] From that we can deduce that Walter’s world is a separate universe from the SH’s Otherworld and also from Alessa’s Otherworld (A.K.A. Otherside). Although it is mentioned that he has control over his world, it does not negate the fact it is still an Otherworld; meaning: it is a world born out of Walter’s nightmares and delusions come to life (open spaces are present in the worlds because Walter fears them, while the Otherworld provides it). However, as it is his world, he can make attempts to contravene it and evince his unconscious part. How? For instance, by stuffing it in a sort of box, as a boxlike world- which is what you see in Silent Hill 4: Walter connected all of these worlds (for instance, through the Spiral Staircase, the elevator, the Greedy worm, and other mental constructions, which function is of connective origin). If a graphic perspective would be applied to the Otherworld structure, Walter’s Kingdom would look something like this (just to display it symbolically):
___________________________________________________
I..................................Room302........................................I
I...............................Hospital world....................................I
I...............................Subway world.....................................I
I................................Forest world......................................I
I...........................Water Prison world..................................I
I...............................Building world.....................................I
I.............................Apartment world....................................I

If you look at it that way, or through whichever type of schematized schedule, it will all sort up in an encircled image. All of these worlds are endlessly open and spacious. All of these are locations that Walter visited and in which Walter spent time in. Moreover, all of them seem larger than they are in the real world (in the Otherworld they actually got enhanced by Walter’s child perspective). To sum up, the structure of the SH4 Otherworld is in fact Walter’s agoraphobic need to confine and isolate things (not hikkikomori!), to stuff the big and terrifying worlds (memories) in a box that seems claustrophobic to us, but is in fact related to agoraphobia. Later we’ll see that the boxlike world perspective serves the function of panopticism.

PERCEPTUAL FACTORS
As psychological facts have been listed, it’s time to enumerate the perceptual factors that manifested themselves in the worlds. But first of all, let’s draw some rules. It is very important to comprehend that Walter did not suffer from agoraphobia as a child. During his infantile years, he possibly did not show any signs of it as he wanted to find out the world in which his mother was asleep. Only later, after experiencing the “bad” things (social embarrassment) that the world had provided him, the agoraphobia disorder started to spread in his psyche. The main component this paper deals with is the distorted space perception (which is in fact a childlike perception) that you can find in the following worlds:

 Subway world- One of the interesting elements in the Subway world is the escalator, a symbol of the path’s beginning to the deepest truth. Plus, its image is usually spaciously perceived. However, one of the fundamental visually strong elements here is the ceiling, stretching itself to the night sky. A real subway usually lacks of such design. It is in fact the perception of a child, walking around in the big and scary subway all by himself. As the escalator goes down, little Walter keeps getting sucked in this grand world; more and more until he completely loses track and the only thing he can see is the dark sky, containing the bad secrets of this enormous sinful globe. Within the subway escalator there’s the Wall Man. Even though it’s usually interpreted as Walter’s repressed claustrophobia, contrariwise, it represents agoraphobia. Since the Wall Man is mostly found in narrow, usually long locations (escalators, Water Prison hallway), it represents Walter’s tendency of confinement.

 Forest world- The holder of the key Henry dug up has a writing carved on it: “The holder of this key will wander for eternity” . The same key makes Henry wander for eternity until you make him stuff it in the room. The feel you got from repeating the same track is that you were lost in a spacious area. In practice, this is the perspective Walter suffers from. When Walter was a child, during his traveling, he started thinking he would never find his mother in this enormous universe that scares him so much and distracts him from his true goal as the surface has no limits (which is also the reason of why he created his Kingdom).

 Water Prison world- The Water Prison shows a slightly different perspective from the other worlds. The Water prison is a cylinder shaped prison from the 18th century, constructed on the basis of Jeremy Bentham’s panopticon. A panopticon is philosophically a discipline construct used to keep people away from any kind of outside world or even cellmates, which makes it very different from the other, traditional prisons. The phenomenon that matters to us is space. The panopticon’s role is to alienate space from the prisoner’s perception, which is also what the Order practiced in the early stages of Walter’s distorted self-formation. To continue, although a cell is more of a claustrophobic place, because of Walter’s child perspective, it is visually enhanced. And although the prison hallways seem long on the map, the trajectory of the annular well in practice is very long. Plus, the ceiling height is great, making the structure untypical for a panopticon. However, in the outside of the prison a different story dominates. On the margins of the prison the fog spreads a sense of infinity as you can’t see the bottom of the prison. Another characteristic of this world is the connective structure (of course, not present in the real world) attached to the ceiling of the building that connects the previous worlds to itself (“the elevator”). It is amazing the depiction Walter created. Regardless its enormous features, it is still just a fracture of Walter’s mind (it’s an issue of the boxlike perspective). When you enter the elevator and gain access to the prison, while sliding down the sky, you can really experience Walter’s perspective of depth. Nevertheless, one of the most important elements here is the spiral staircase that encircles the building. The thing I would like to underline is the choice of trajectory. You can choose whether to take the long road (the Water Prison spiral staircase) or the shortcut (the ladders). If you observe, Walter never uses the ladder nor jumps in those cell holes as someone would expect. He keeps wandering at the outside margins of the prison, almost as if he was lost, not able to escape this sort of spacious trap. The same happens to Eileen, who obliviously cannot use ladders because of her broken arm and leg. However if you think about it: during the game she may become possessed (depending on her health) by Walter and so she is also impaired from taking shorter roads (as you know, 50% of the gameplay with Eileen is searching for a longer road she can use).

 Building world- The Building world, by itself, is nothing else but a depiction of a typical industrial chain of buildings, connected by various ways, containing multiple pathways, doors, staircases, etc… A situation we confront here is the fall of Richard Braintree from a five-store building and his survival (Walter’s Kingdom is outside the real world boundaries, thus permits him to live until the right moment). I mention this cutscene because the height Richard fell from is another distorted space perception. Walter, in fact, exaggerated space again. Both of the times Richard felt may allude to the big falls Walter experienced during his life, implying to the fact that Walter keeps magnifying terror. Another important element of the Building world is the aggrandized height of the rectangular staircase. Furthermore, before Otherworld Room 302 there’s the One Truth’s location. The penultimate task Henry must overcome is the One Truth, the guardian of the deepest truth. The monster has its skin stretched in a metal frame, thus enabling him to move except the directions of up and down- a symbol of Walter’s tendency to control things (further discussed in the Panopticism section). Moreover, the place is naturally oversized: the earthly ground and the wall are stretched (the One Truth and the Puppets are not visible when they slide back up) and an enormous hole had invaded the place. The task is representative of Walter’s general perception of the world. The door that leads to the deepest truth represents the escape from the world and he had to find the solution key (which reflects Henry’s task now as the Receiver of Wisdom). However, as much as enormous the earth is, the playground is limited: there is always a huge black hole that leads to doom, the infinite failure Walter tries so hard to avoid. Nevertheless, there is just one key, one truth in this unlimited world that unlocks his paradise, while all of the others are false prophets.

 The Spiral Staircase- The Spiral staircase is the connection between the worlds that lead to the deepest truth. It is the essential bond of Walter’s kingdom, perception and state of mind. Firstly, as the Spiral Staircase is listed as a perceptual factor, its function is scilicet oblivious: connection; it’s the thing that keeps Walter’s mental fabrications together. Secondly, it is surrounded by fragments of a wall. Outside these fragments there’s nothing but void. The scenery is especially visible in the bottom floor where you can observe the unlimited maidan. Obliviously, it spreads a sense of depth as it is the road to the deepest truth. Moreover, as the story proceeds the mist starts to vanish and the surroundings get clearer, in fact the surroundings get darker. Finally, from these factors we can deduce the meaning of the Spiral Staircase. Since he was an infant, Walter entered in this universe, in search for his mother, without knowing neither its limits nor exits (not conscious of the fact that there is no real exit). The mist of the staircase, in the beginning, represents the depths of the unknown- the initial stages of Walter’s life, while the subsequent darkness represents Walter’s consecutive perception of the world (a factor of derealization).
It’s important to mention this was the psychological analysis that deals with agoraphobia from the perspective of perceptual factors. However, there is also another extremely important point of view that indicates some philosophical means, induced by the Otherworld.

THE ROLE OF PANOPTICISM IN HIS KINGDOM
As mentioned before, in the analysis of the Water Prison world characteristics, the panopticon is philosophically a discipline construct, invented by Jeremy Bentham, used to keep people away from cellmates and any kind of outside world. Why I mention this, extreme type of building now, is because of the fact that the structure of the Spiral Staircase, in symbiosis with the other worlds resembles a Panopticon. A Panopticon is a discipline construction that can be used for the function of a prison. It’s formed by a circular layer of wall in which prisoners are situated and an observation wing. As mentioned previously, the stairs (of the otherworld circular staircase) are surrounded by a wall, by which it strictly makes it resemble to the structure we have seen in the Water Prison world.

But the question is: why did Walter fabricate a world that resembles his childhood memories of pure mental torture? The answer is simple: acquisition. As the disciplinary goal of Bentham was to make subjects more obedient and amenable, such was the Order’s goal. From aspects of the entire series we can extrapolate such fact. By taking example from Dahlia, who tried to achieve full control of Alessa’s power by manipulating Harry and others; Claudia, the leader of the ‘Missionaries’, capable of revoking the Otherworld; Margaret, the Keeper of Lore of the Shepherd’s Glen Order, able to convince families into murdering their own children, we can conclude that the leadership characteristics of the Order had touching points with the philosophy of Panopticism. Panopticism is a social theory originally developed by the French philosopher Michel Foucault in his book, Discipline and Punish. In fact, he builds on Jeremy Bentham's conceptualization of a panopticon as he elaborates upon the function of disciplinary mechanisms in the prison and illustrates the function of discipline as an apparatus of power. Furthermore, the philosophical standard was exercised on Walter. In the infantile stages of Walter’s life, when he was actually being kept in the Water Prison, he did not yet evolve the disorder of agoraphobia (which by its characteristics does not even show until the early 20’s or late 30’s). Therefore, he actually did not yet see the necessity of the Panopticon. Only later, with the contact of the outside world and the evolvement of such disorder he formed this morbid fear, which will be the trigger that will make him use the memory materials to create his kingdom. And the main material was in fact the panopticon (used as the main design of his world) that he used to distance himself from the real incontrollable world and create his own world, less stretched by which he is in control. These are the aspects that prove Walter’s tendency to shrink the universe as a cause of agoraphobia is the incapacity to keep things in control (which is the reason of why panic attacks are triggered in wide and crowded spaces). Another important fact is Walter’s choice of panopticon. Usually, the structure comprehends a surveillance tower, the annular well and a circular wall with cells aloof from the tower (the distance was approximately 14’ wide). However, the Water Prison is another type of panopticon that had the cells attached to the tower, making it possible for the guard to move them by using a special mechanism. Walter then took the opportunity to “use” the Order’s panopticon, which was even more reduced than the typical one. One of Walter’s tendencies was to shrink this huge agoraphobic world.
However, turning back to acquirement, a memo from Silent Hill Origins can give us some useful information from a more psychological point of view: ”The other personality contains all the rage and anger of the abused and in many ways becomes a mirror of the abuser, seeking to inflict its pain on others. Sadly, it is often this self that becomes dominant.” Usually, in cases of fractioned personalities, such as Walter’s (DID), one of the personality is predisposed to love the abuser and become simile to him. In this case, we may say that the Order is the abuser and Walter the victim. Now, a part of Walter becomes the mirror of the abuser, a mirror of the Order as his goal is the same as theirs (even though Walter believes that it is his mother that he’s waking up). On balance, as the Order inflicted pain on him, now he inflicts pain on others. As the answer to the question of Walter’s choice of Otherworld was acquirement, it can be deduced that the idea has been extrapolated from the cult’s philosophy that has been inflicted upon him.

An important function of the panopticon is the apparatus of power. "He who is subjected to a field of visibility, and who knows it, assumes responsibility for the constraints of power; he makes them play spontaneously upon himself; he inscribes in himself the power relation in which he simultaneously plays both roles; he becomes the principle of his own subjection" (202-203, Discipline and Punish, M. Foucault). In other words, Foucault suggests, the ever-visible inmate is always “the object of information, never a subject in communication.” – from this quote we can ascertain that Foucault’s suggestion served Walter’s idea pretty well (and the Order’s ideas too as their prime constraints, except control, were anonymity). “I’m always watching you… Always watching you…” is what Henry hears in his room after waking up during the second round. Yes, Walter was watching him and the other victims, even though they did not see him. Not only did he watch, but he had also control over them. This proves that another convenient asset to Walter’s Kingdom was power. He was the master of his own “panopticon“, the person behind the peephole observing all of their moves. The victims became the prisoners of his disturbing world. Furthermore, by keeping in mind the symptom of derealization (Walter’s disconnection from the real world), we can identify the role of panopticism in the Kingdom: to give him control over the world and to keep him away from it; a way to make the world just an object of use (for the ritual of the 21 Sacraments), but never a subject in communication, never a connection.

However, as narrow as Walter tried to make it, we are still talking about the Otherworld, which is not someone’s ideal place, but someone’s ideal place invaded by nightmares and delusions come to life. From a metaphorical aspect, Walter could have ripped the Water Prison and put it in his own universe that will be ripped apart by the Otherworld. Walter’s panopticon still contains the same design, except instead of floors with cells, we’ve got a floor with a world- to Walter an enormous cell as the open world is his mental prison. Afterwards, the observation zone has been crushed to represent the crushing of the Order and indicating that the panopticon is no longer in possession of the Order, but in fact, of Walter himself that has taken full responsibility of completing the Ritual of the 21 Sacraments. He’s now the one that has the power and it can be proven by Foucault’s line: "We have seen that anyone may come and exercise in the central tower the functions of surveillance” (p.98, Discipline and Punish, M. Foucault).
Although the Spiral Staircase may have been Walter’s tentative to shrink the world, the Otherworld did its thing, it created a ‘wider’ outcome than Walter expected. Therefore, we can deduce that the previously mentioned perspective of the boxlike world serves the function of a rather panoptical world in which Walter tries to keep his delusions and fears in control (such as agoraphobia).
___________________________________________________
I..................................Room302........................................I
...............................I...................I.....................................
...............................I...................I.....................................
I...............................Hospital world....................................I
...............................I...................I.....................................
...............................I...................I.....................................
I...............................Subway world.....................................I
...............................I...................I.....................................
...............................I...................I.....................................
I................................Forest world......................................I
...............................I...................I.....................................
...............................I...................I.....................................
I...........................Water Prison world..................................I
...............................I...................I.....................................
...............................I...................I.....................................
I...............................Building world.....................................I
...............................I...................I.....................................
...............................I...................I.....................................
I.........................Otherworld Room 302................................I
...............................I...................I.....................................
...............................I...................I.....................................

To sum up, in this very complex issue, what matters the most is that Walter proceeded by the philosophy of panopticism to construct his mental panopticon, insomuch to eliminate or minimize the contact with the open world. It is his way of dealing with the disorder of agoraphobia.

_________________
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My Bestsellers Clerk
 Post subject: Re: The Agoraphobia theory
     
         
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Missing since: 06 Nov 2011
Notes left: 401
Yes, I agree, this is a very complex theory you have going on here. The only problem I had reading this is how a few things that made it so "complex" should not have been written the way they were (some vocabulary misplaced or sounding out of context, etc). Though those are extremely minor mistakes. I applaud all the work and research you have done, as well as the parallels you have drawn from psychology to Walter's world. This is by far the most comprehensive SH4 analysis I have ever had the pleasure to read. I have nothing to say against this because the information you have written is completely backed up, and I just can't find a way to find flaw in what you are stating. Over-analysis might be what I thought at first, but it actually makes great sense to read the creation of Walter's otherworld.

Definitely an interesting and enlightening read.


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Historical Society Historian
 Post subject: Re: The Agoraphobia theory
     
         
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Missing since: 01 Aug 2006
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Very nice article. I nominate it for being Quicklinks'd.

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I thought he meant the special powers of her vagina.


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Just Passing Through
 Post subject: Re: The Agoraphobia theory
     
         
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Nice article, keep up the good work.


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SHH Cult Subscriber
SHH Cult Subscriber
 Post subject: Re: The Agoraphobia theory
     
         
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Quicklink'd. Very interesting read, mikefile. Kudos. 8)


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Gravedigger
 Post subject: Re: The Agoraphobia theory
     
         
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As Good a theory as can be..Keep it up pal!!

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